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When Do You Need a Checkup First Before Starting Exercise?

BP checkHow do you know if you need to get a checkup or medical clearance before you start any exercise training? You should have regular checkups at least annually with your doctor or another healthcare provider if you have any type of diabetes. This helps you keep on top of any problems that may pop up over time that have nothing to do with being physically active.

However, you probably don’t need to see a doctor before you start doing easy workouts or moderate activities like brisk walking. Requiring anyone with diabetes to get medical clearance before starting any type or intensity of exercise is recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine, but is not recommended by the American Diabetes Association because it sets too big of a barrier to participating in regular activities.

On the other hand, having a checkup before you begin more vigorous workouts is a good idea. It also depends on your age, your general health, and your physical activity level. If you’re already doing intense exercise, it’s not necessary, but it is advised for almost everyone with diabetes who is not already exercising at that level—just to be safe.

If/when you do have a checkup, get your blood pressure, heart rate, and body weight measured. If your doctor recommends that you do an exercise stress test, you’ll have to do walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike for around ten minutes. Your checkup may also include lab tests (urinalysis, kidney function testing, serum lipid evaluation, and electrolyte analysis) and screening for any diabetes-related complications (including heart, nerve, eye, and kidney disease). Most complications will not keep you from being active, but you may need to take precautions to exercise safely and effectively in certain cases.

For most people, getting a diagnostic graded exercise test is really going too far. Having one is only recommended by the American Diabetes Association if you’re over 40 and have diabetes; or if you’re over 30, have had diabetes for 10 or more years, smoke, have high blood pressure, have high cholesterol, or have eye or kidney problems related to diabetes. If you’re planning to do vigorous training that gets your heart rate up high, these criteria are relevant. If you’re just planning on doing mild or moderate aerobic activity or resistance training, such extensive (and often expensive) testing is unnecessary if you’re reasonably healthy or already fit and don’t have any symptoms of heart or vessel disease.

If you have any pre-existing health complications, you may need to take extra care to prevent problems during exercise. If your blood glucose has been in check, you’ve already been physically active, and you don’t have any serious diabetic complications, then go ahead and keep doing what you’re doing. If you’re very active, getting an extra checkup before you replace your current exercise regime with another exercise routine is neither necessary nor advised.

You still may need to take certain precautions when you exercise, particularly related to getting low blood glucose during and following the activity, going too high, and getting dehydrated. If you have any concerns, check with your healthcare provider at your next visit to discuss any precautions that may be important for your unique health circumstances when exercising.